Hospice Care

Make the end-of-life journey memorable with quality care

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In Your Home

Hospice of Southwest Ohio provides care in your loved one's private home, allowing them to continue living in a familiar space.
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In Our Care Center

Our Patient Care Center located in Madeira, Ohio provides short- and long-term, 24-hour hospice care.
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In a Healthcare Center

We provide care in a number of healthcare facilities, allowing your loved one to stay in a familiar and comfortable space.
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Respite Care

Many people need additional help, have an event they need to attend, travel requirements or just need a little break. We’re here for you.
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Palliative Care

Get relief from symptoms of serious illnesses with a team of trained specialists

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Chronic Disease Symptom Management

People who are diagnosed with an acute or chronic serious illness go through a lot of stress. Palliative care provides support for those suffering from pain or other symptoms of chronic diseases.
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Pain Management

People who are diagnosed with an acute or chronic serious illness can suffer from pain as a result. Palliative care focuses on providing personalized support for these patients, helping them reach a higher quality of life.
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RESOURCES

Palliative Care vs. Hospice Care

 

Understanding the Differences Between Palliative Care and Hospice Care

The terms “palliative care” and “hospice care” are often used interchangeably but they are not the same. Hospice is only one type of palliative care that can be provided in the last six months of life. Traditionally, palliative care can be offered anytime during the course of a debilitating disease or serious illness and, ideally, should begin at the time of diagnosis.

Palliative care relieves and treats the symptoms of a chronic or life-limiting illness. Hospice care focuses on caring for, not curing, those with these same illnesses. When pain or symptoms become too difficult to manage at the place the patient calls home, or the caregiver needs respite time, hospice makes short-term inpatient care available. In addition, it can provide things like needed drugs, medical supplies, equipment and bereavement support and counseling to surviving family and friends.

When deciding if you or a loved one need hospice care or palliative care, consider the following:

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Palliative Care

WHAT is it?

Palliative care provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms of a life-limiting and/or serious illness, providing a greater quality of life and daily living for both patients and their families. Palliative care relives suffering from symptoms of chronic diseases such as pain, nausea, fatigue, shortness of breath and depression.

WHEN is it?

There is no time frame for palliative care — it can be short-term or long-term. It provides comfort and support to patients who may eventually be cured or for those who will cope with lifelong diseases.

WHERE is it?

Palliative care can be provided at a hospital, in a nursing home or other long-term care facility or at the patient’s home.

WHO provides it?

Palliative care is prescribed by a doctor, who recognizes when there is a need for it. The care team may include palliative care physicians, primary care doctors, nurses, home health aides, social workers and chaplains. Care visits are typically once or twice a month.

HOW is it paid for?

Palliative care is paid for by the patient’s private insurance or by payers like Medicare and Medicaid.

WHY is it needed?

Palliative care encompasses the whole self, caring for physical, emotional and spiritual needs and is often used in conjunction with hospice care.

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Hospice Care

WHAT is it?

Hospice care is provided at the end of someone’s life, recognizing that patients and families suffer differently when the end of life is nearing and may include some form of palliative care. Hospice care doesn't provide the expectation or even the suggestion of a cure. It's intended only to manage symptoms and to keep the patient comfortable until he or she passes away.

WHEN is it?

Hospice care is triggered by a timeframe — it cannot be recommended until a doctor certifies a patient is within six months of the end of life, but it can extend beyond six months if the patient outlives their diagnosis.

WHERE is it?

Hospice care can be provided at home, in a nursing home, at a hospital or in a hospice care facility such as HSWO’s Patient Care Center in Madiera, near Cincinnati, Ohio.

WHO provides it?

Patients may change doctors when entering hospice care, but some providers like HSWO allow you to keep your primary care doctor. Hospice providers have their own medical/clinical staff on-call 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

HOW is it paid for?

Hospice care is covered 100 percent by payers like Medicare and Medicaid and some private insurances are accepted (amount of coverage will vary).

WHY is it needed?

Hospice care assists the patient and their loved ones with the emotional, psychosocial and spiritual aspects of dying.

 

Want to learn more?

We’re available 24 hours per day, seven days per week at (513) 216-9852 to discuss any questions or concerns regarding hospice care, palliative care, grief support and more.

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